Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Auld Lang Syne

Another "copy cat" blog post, but I was very happy to find this to share.

Listen up!

This was put up on YouTube on Nov 13, 2013.

Here's all the information describing it which is quite a lot and including many facts I did not know.

No copyright is claimed in [the music].
Arista/Legacy's 2012 compilation The Classic Christmas Album is not the first collection of Kenny G's holiday recordings -- he's had two prior, both compiling highlights from three albums -- but this set whittles down his seasonal tunes to a compact 16 tracks. As expected, most of the big Christmas carols and seasonal standards are here: "Winter Wonderland," "White Christmas," and "Silver Bells" sit alongside "Silent Night," "Do You Hear What I Hear," and "The First Noel." Perhaps there are no surprises, but any listener looking for a consistent collection of Kenny G's Christmas songs will find this quite enjoyable. (Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine for Allmusic)
"Auld Lang Syne" is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. It is well known in many countries, especially in the English-speaking world, its traditional use being to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, it is also sung at funerals, graduations and as a farewell or ending to other occasions. The international Boy Scout youth movement, in many countries, uses it as a close to jamborees and other functions.
The song's Scots title may be translated into English literally as "old long since", or more idiomatically, "long long ago", "days gone by" or "old times". Consequently "For auld lang syne", as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as "for (the sake of) old times".
The phrase "Auld Lang Syne" is also used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570--1638), Allan Ramsay (1686--1757), and James Watson (1711) as well as older folk songs predating Burns. Matthew Fitt uses the phrase "In the days of auld lang syne" as the equivalent of "Once upon a time..." in his retelling of fairy tales in the Scots language.
The song begins by posing a rhetorical question as to whether it is right that old times be forgotten, and is generally interpreted as a call to remember long-standing friendships. Thomson's Select Songs of Scotland was published in 1799 in which the second verse about greeting and toasting was moved to its present position at the end.
The confusion over the song is arguably almost as much of a tradition as the song itself. As revelers stumble and mumble through the verses--singing the "auld lang syne" part much louder than the rest of the song because it's really the only part people know--someone always asks what the words mean.
The title of the Scottish tune translates to "times gone by" and is about remembering friends from the past and not letting them be forgotten.
Despite its strong association with New Year's Eve, "Auld Lang Syne," written by Robert Burns in the 1700s, was never intended to be a holiday song. Guy Lombardo is credited with popularizing the song when his band used it as a segue between two radio programs during a live performance at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York in 1929. By coincidence, they played "Auld Lang Syne" just after the clock hit midnight, and a New Year's tradition was born.
The song, and the confusion that comes with it, has been immortalized in countless movies and TV shows.

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne ?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we'll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you'll buy your pint cup !
and surely I'll buy mine !
And we'll take a cup o' kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.


We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine ;
But we've wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.


We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine† ;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.


And there's a hand my trusty friend !
And give me a hand o' thine !
And we'll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.


sound recording administered by SME
(thanks for allowing this to remain)
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Auld Lang Syne

1 comment:

  1. As we placed the last blog post of 2015, we had no idea this blog would be ending in 2016 when Wendell Davis Smith passed from his earthly life to life eternal on May 18 and joined his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and so many friends and family who had gone on before him. Thank you for traveling with us on a wonderful journey that continues eternally where we will know even as also we are known. (1 Corinthians 13)